Phone: 636.926.9000
  Fax: 636.926.9955

  Phone: 636.926.9000
  Fax: 636.926.9955

830 Westwood Industrial Park Dr  
Weldon Spring, MO 63304  
sales@tubularusa.com  

830 Westwood Industrial Park Dr  
Weldon Spring, MO 63304  
sales@tubularusa.com  

 Steel Pipe

We can provide just about any type of pipe you may need. We stock, or can produce pipe from the following specifications…

  • ASTM-A53
  • ASTM-A500
  • ASTM-A252
  • ASTM-A500

 

Brief History of Pipe

People have used pipe for thousands of years. Archeological evidence suggests that the Chinese used reed pipe for transporting water to desired locations as early as 2000 B.C. Clay tubes that were used by other ancient civilizations have been discovered. During the first century A.D., the first lead pipes were constructed in Europe. In tropical countries, bamboo tubes were used to transport water. Colonial Americans used wood for a similar purpose. In 1652, the first waterworks was made in Boston using hollow logs.

An early method for producing metal tubes quickly and inexpensively was patented by James Russell in 1824. In his method, tubes were created by joining together opposite edges of a flat iron strip. The metal was first heated until it was malleable. Using a drop hammer, the edges folded together and welded. The pipe was finished by passing it through a groove and rolling mill.

Russell's method was not used long because in the next year, Comelius Whitehouse developed a better method for making metal tubes. This process, called the butt-weld process is the basis for our current pipe-making procedures. In his method, thin sheets of iron were heated and drawn through a cone-shaped opening. As the metal went through the opening, its edges curled up and created a pipe shape. The two ends were welded together to finish the pipe. The first manufacturing plant to use this process in the United States was opened in 1832 in Philadelphia.

Gradually, improvements were made in the Whitehouse method. One of the most important innovations was introduced by John Moon in 1911. He suggested the continuous process method in which a manufacturing plant could produce pipe in an unending stream. He built machinery for this specific purpose and many pipe manufacturing facilities adopted it.

While the welded tube processes were being developed, needs for seamless metal pipe arouse. Seamless pipes are those which do not have a welded seam. They were first made by drilling a hole through the center of a solid cylinder. This method was developed during the late 1800s. Seamless tube was used extensively in the manufacture of bicycles. As bicycle manufacturing gave way to auto manufacturing, seamless tubes were still needed for gasoline and oil lines. This demand was made even greater as larger oil deposits were found.

As early as 1840, ironworkers produced seamless tube by drilling a hole through a solid metal, round billet. The billet was then heated and drawn through a series of dies which elongated it to form a pipe. This method was inefficient because it was difficult to drill the hole in the center. This method eventually evolved to the roller techniques of today. 

Pipe Today

In sizes from 1/8-inch thru 12-inch, pipe is known by its nominal inside diameter which is a little different from it actual inside diameter. Early pipe manufacturers made the walls heavier than they eventually needed. In correcting this they took the excess from the inside of the pipe to avoid changing the size of the companion fittings. When you get to pipe sizes over 12-inch, the pipe is known by its outside diameter.

For all pipe, the outside diameter remains relatively constant. As the wall gets heavier, the ID gets smaller.

The traditional designations for wall thickness are STD (standard), XH (Extra Heavy) and XXH (Double Extra heavy).

ANSI, ASTM, and ASME wanted to broaden the range of wall thicknesses so they created a range of wall thicknesses or schedules ranging from Schedule 10 to schedule 160. These schedule numbers indicate approximate values for 1000 times pressure-stress ratios.

ANSI Chart Steel Pipes

We can provide just about any type of pipe you may need. We stock, or can produce pipe from the following specifications…

  • ASTM-A53
  • ASTM-A500
  • ASTM-A252
  • ASTM-A500

 

Brief History of Pipe

People have used pipe for thousands of years. Archeological evidence suggests that the Chinese used reed pipe for transporting water to desired locations as early as 2000 B.C. Clay tubes that were used by other ancient civilizations have been discovered. During the first century A.D., the first lead pipes were constructed in Europe. In tropical countries, bamboo tubes were used to transport water. Colonial Americans used wood for a similar purpose. In 1652, the first waterworks was made in Boston using hollow logs.

An early method for producing metal tubes quickly and inexpensively was patented by James Russell in 1824. In his method, tubes were created by joining together opposite edges of a flat iron strip. The metal was first heated until it was malleable. Using a drop hammer, the edges folded together and welded. The pipe was finished by passing it through a groove and rolling mill.

Russell's method was not used long because in the next year, Comelius Whitehouse developed a better method for making metal tubes. This process, called the butt-weld process is the basis for our current pipe-making procedures. In his method, thin sheets of iron were heated and drawn through a cone-shaped opening. As the metal went through the opening, its edges curled up and created a pipe shape. The two ends were welded together to finish the pipe. The first manufacturing plant to use this process in the United States was opened in 1832 in Philadelphia.

Gradually, improvements were made in the Whitehouse method. One of the most important innovations was introduced by John Moon in 1911. He suggested the continuous process method in which a manufacturing plant could produce pipe in an unending stream. He built machinery for this specific purpose and many pipe manufacturing facilities adopted it.

While the welded tube processes were being developed, needs for seamless metal pipe arouse. Seamless pipes are those which do not have a welded seam. They were first made by drilling a hole through the center of a solid cylinder. This method was developed during the late 1800s. Seamless tube was used extensively in the manufacture of bicycles. As bicycle manufacturing gave way to auto manufacturing, seamless tubes were still needed for gasoline and oil lines. This demand was made even greater as larger oil deposits were found.

As early as 1840, ironworkers produced seamless tube by drilling a hole through a solid metal, round billet. The billet was then heated and drawn through a series of dies which elongated it to form a pipe. This method was inefficient because it was difficult to drill the hole in the center. This method eventually evolved to the roller techniques of today. 

Pipe Today

In sizes from 1/8-inch thru 12-inch, pipe is known by its nominal inside diameter which is a little different from it actual inside diameter. Early pipe manufacturers made the walls heavier than they eventually needed. In correcting this they took the excess from the inside of the pipe to avoid changing the size of the companion fittings. When you get to pipe sizes over 12-inch, the pipe is known by its outside diameter.

For all pipe, the outside diameter remains relatively constant. As the wall gets heavier, the ID gets smaller.

The traditional designations for wall thickness are STD (standard), XH (Extra Heavy) and XXH (Double Extra heavy).

ANSI, ASTM, and ASME wanted to broaden the range of wall thicknesses so they created a range of wall thicknesses or schedules ranging from Schedule 10 to schedule 160. These schedule numbers indicate approximate values for 1000 times pressure-stress ratios.

ANSI Chart Steel Pipes