Phone: 636.926.9000
  Fax: 636.926.9955

  Phone: 636.926.9000
  Fax: 636.926.9955

830 Westwood Industrial Park Dr  
Weldon Spring, MO 63304  
sales@tubularusa.com  

830 Westwood Industrial Park Dr  
Weldon Spring, MO 63304  
sales@tubularusa.com  

 Zinc Flo-Coat and Gatorshield

This method of coating is done in-line on the tube mill and provides the most corrosion protection for the tube over any other method of zinc coating while still providing an attractive finish and excellent adherence so it does not flake off during severe fabrication. The process utilizes closely guarded secrets in the mechanics of application and in the chemistry of our coatings. We triple coat our tube. The three coatings are…

  1. 99.99% Pure Zinc (virtually lead free)
  2. Conversion Coat
  3. Clear Polymer Coat

 

The industry standard for testing the corrosion resistance of a galvanized tube is the ASTM B117 salt spray test. That specification spells out specific guidelines for performing this test. The purpose of the test is to put all galvanized steel products on an even playing field. The salt-water mixture that is sprayed onto the tube is highly corrosive. The test basically accelerates time so we can see how a tube would perform after years of service in a normal application. A few weeks in the salt spray booth simulates years of a corrosive environment that a tube would see in the real world. Our Flo-Coat and Gatorshield tube consistently net better salt spray results than any other method of galvanizing.

  • Zinc Electro-Plate – This is a thin coating applied in an electroplating process. It is a very attractive coating, but cannot be applied to long lengths. Typically 120” or shorter. It is the least resistant to corrosion of all methods of galvanizing and lasts about 1/10 as long in salt spray as Flo-Coat
  • Pregalvanized – This tube is produced from coil steel that has already been galvanized. It typically cannot be applied to wall thicknesses heavier than 12ga. When the steel is placed on a mill, formed into a tube, and welded, all of the zinc is burned away in the heat affected zone of the weld. This creates a long bare spot down the entire length of the tube. That bare spot can be painted or re-metalized, but it will always be far more susceptible to corrosion than the rest of the tube. Also, a pregalvanized tube must have a coating of oil sprayed onto it to keep it from white rusting. This is messy and the oil eventually evaporates.
  • Hot Dip Galvanized – This is where you take a raw tube and dip it into a molten bath of zinc. It usually involves freight to and from a hot dip galvanizer. It is dangerous to weld due to high lead content in the zinc and is not good for fabrication. It is good for very heavy and large tube that cannot be zinc coated using other methods. It is also good for small weld assemblies.

 

This method of coating is done in-line on the tube mill and provides the most corrosion protection for the tube over any other method of zinc coating while still providing an attractive finish and excellent adherence so it does not flake off during severe fabrication. The process utilizes closely guarded secrets in the mechanics of application and in the chemistry of our coatings. We triple coat our tube. The three coatings are…

  1. 99.99% Pure Zinc (virtually lead free)
  2. Conversion Coat
  3. Clear Polymer Coat

 

The industry standard for testing the corrosion resistance of a galvanized tube is the ASTM B117 salt spray test. That specification spells out specific guidelines for performing this test. The purpose of the test is to put all galvanized steel products on an even playing field. The salt-water mixture that is sprayed onto the tube is highly corrosive. The test basically accelerates time so we can see how a tube would perform after years of service in a normal application. A few weeks in the salt spray booth simulates years of a corrosive environment that a tube would see in the real world. Our Flo-Coat and Gatorshield tube consistently net better salt spray results than any other method of galvanizing.

  • Zinc Electro-Plate – This is a thin coating applied in an electroplating process. It is a very attractive coating, but cannot be applied to long lengths. Typically 120” or shorter. It is the least resistant to corrosion of all methods of galvanizing and lasts about 1/10 as long in salt spray as Flo-Coat
  • Pregalvanized – This tube is produced from coil steel that has already been galvanized. It typically cannot be applied to wall thicknesses heavier than 12ga. When the steel is placed on a mill, formed into a tube, and welded, all of the zinc is burned away in the heat affected zone of the weld. This creates a long bare spot down the entire length of the tube. That bare spot can be painted or re-metalized, but it will always be far more susceptible to corrosion than the rest of the tube. Also, a pregalvanized tube must have a coating of oil sprayed onto it to keep it from white rusting. This is messy and the oil eventually evaporates.
  • Hot Dip Galvanized – This is where you take a raw tube and dip it into a molten bath of zinc. It usually involves freight to and from a hot dip galvanizer. It is dangerous to weld due to high lead content in the zinc and is not good for fabrication. It is good for very heavy and large tube that cannot be zinc coated using other methods. It is also good for small weld assemblies.